The broom is wired to the witch's hands and propped up with a forked stick underneath the gown.

Witches for Halloween!

These homemade witches have been very popular in our neighborhood and held up well over the years. If you would like to learn how to make them, please read on.

Put together a body frame with cut PVC pipe and connectors.  It’s basically a T-frame with neck, shoulder and arm posts.  You can use connectors and different lengths of pipe to bend the arms.  I sprayed the bottom of the main post black so it wouldn’t be seen at night.

PVC pipes with connectors make a frame for the witch's body.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The head is a one gallon plastic milk jug.

PVC frame with a milk jug for the head.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I bought the rubber “old hag” masks from Walgreens, as well as the cheap black wigs and hats.  You can slightly squeeze in the sides of the milk jug to conform to the mask.

Fit the mask onto the milk jug followed by the wig and the hat. Safety pin together.

A spider took up residence on the witch's hat!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I sewed the cape from the easiest sewing pattern I could find and skipped the lining.  Good Will had black nun habits that were perfect for the gown.  I bought rubber monster hands from Walgreens and secured them on the pipes with catamount ties.

The broom is wired to the witch's hands and propped up with a forked stick underneath the gown.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This witch had pipe angled forward to give her a crooked back.  She had to be propped up with a forked stick.

Stirring her brew.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We cut a hole in the bottom of the plastic cauldron and placed a spot light there. Green plastic wrap gave it a glowing effect.

It’s easiest to stick the post into the ground and then dress your witch.  You might have to use craft or floral clay to keep the milk jug from spinning, but it’s fun to see the “exorcist” effect.

Happy Halloween!

If you’d like to see the witches “in action” follow this link.   Witches